Active Composition

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Rules-headerA blog for fiction writers and impending writers. An editor’s perspective.

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Active Writing (Part 3): Active Composition (Plotting)

To recap: I look for active writing—the life of a novel—on three distinct levels: 1. Voice, 2. Language and, 3. Plot.

The late, great Elmore Leonard addressed this dilemma very well: “I try to leave out the parts that people skip.”

Simply put: Tell an exciting, engaging story. A writer divulges the highlights and skips the low points. Determining those potential chapters, scenes, paragraphs, sentences and words to exclude is no less important than what is written. Active composition is knowing the difference.

My advice (to reiterate from Simple, but Exciting): include only those ingredients that 1) build or strengthen plot development; 2) build or strengthen character development, or; 3) set the scene for the reader (where, who, when… perhaps why and how).

I shall chatter many times in this blog about the necessity of plotting… but it’s best to begin at the beginning. How does one go about preparing a good plot? It’s good to think ahead.

The most important preparation of Active Composition is this: Before you begin to write (or certainly before you write too much… as some writers approach a blank page, a fresh idea, a new novel, with blissful ignorance) is know where you’re going. Certainly before you finish your first chapter, I recommend knowing—at least intuiting—where your story will end.

Rule #14: Before you wander along too far, develop your story from A-to-Z. Meaning, formulate a solid game plan ASAP. Be sure you have both your plot and your characters fairly well determined—with no insurmountable obstacles—from page 1 to THE END.

A hypothetical. Let’s say I want to write a novel about Lisa, a young, adopted woman with a prosthetic leg, who decides to walk from Miami to Seattle—a 3300 mile trek—to meet her birth mother for the first time.

In one sentence, I’ve outlined a credible protagonist, her intent, and the probable (or at least possible) conclusion of her ordeal. I can now intuit a host of conflicts and stimulating engagements along the way, an opportunity for personal growth (did I mention that Lisa’s afraid of the dark?), the chance of encountering many delightful or mischievous characters and, of course, the obligatory dramatic conclusion.

While I probably won’t know (not yet, not exactly) all of Lisa’s trials and tribulations along the way, I intuit my story will indeed end in Seattle, with an encounter between Lisa and her mother. Will the woman be receptive? Will she be dismissive? Perhaps that element remains hazy. However, as a developing plot, I’ve mapped myself much or most of an A-to-Z game plan—a beginning to an end. I trust that I know enough about my character, and about myself as a writer, to begin my story.

Remember, it’s okay that neither my protagonist nor I know what’s lurking around every corner. I may not know what specific event will transpire on page 25, or on page 250. Maybe Lisa finds true love along the way—but where? Walking through Georgia? Through Kansas? Through Oregon? Those specifics may still be whirling around in my head. We need not know every detail before we embark. And even if we think we know, much will likely change as we continue the journey.

As I begin to compose the basic plot points of my novel, my principle job is to highlight only those areas of Lisa’s marathon walkabout that matter to a reader. It’s important to write only what matters to your story. (Or, conversely, leave out the boring parts.) That’s Rule #12, by the way. I need not depict every one of the 6,508,014 steps that Lisa will endure to complete the trip—but I definitely want to mention the 2am tornado she encounters in Nebraska, the kind stranger in Tennessee, the motorcycle gang in Missouri and the moment she finds true love in Montana.

Active composition is writing only the essential elements of her story, while eliminating or ignoring those parts that don’t move the plot forward. If Lisa picks up a discarded gum-wrapper on Interstate 40, outside of Rapid City—big deal. Doesn’t interest me in the least. However, if Lisa finds a gum wrapper in Gainesville and vows to pick up every piece of rubbish she discovers along the way—that development becomes an important character trait and a plot point! As an author, I need not document every piece of trash she picks up, either. Show me a few unique examples… oh, and include the discarded Lottery ticket she plucks from the roadside in Buzzard Springs—a $180 million winner. That’s probably worth a mention.

So, yeah, Rule #12: Leave out the boring parts. (Write only what matters to your story.)
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“Sacred Economics” Author Eileen Workman to Speak at Santa Barbara’s Lucidity Festival 4/13

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Lucidity Festival‘s Spiritual Economics Panel Hosts Controversial Political, Socio-Economic and Spiritual Author Eileen Workman to discuss a shift from modern society to a life-affirming global community on Sunday April 13, 2014.

San Francisco, CA (PRWEB) April 11, 2014

On Sunday, April 13, 2014 at 1:30 p.m., Santa Barbara’s Lucidity Festival will feature controversial political, socio-economic and spiritual author/blogger Eileen Workman on a Spiritual Economics Panel. The open-source transformational arts and music festival is hosting several Wisdom Keepers to discuss the future of our global economic society.

Workman, author of “Sacred Economics: The Currency of Life” from Muse Harbor Publishing, will speak about conscious evolution and spiritual awakening being the keys for shifting our modern society away from the power/dominator attitudes of Empire, into a more loving, compassionate and life-affirming global community.

A former Wall Street financial adviser who walked away from her profession at the height of her career after a spiritual awakening, Workman realized that what she’d been doing did not serve life’s highest values.

On Sunday, the author will share a hopeful vision for how to create an abundant, harmonious economy that eliminates indebtedness, exploitation and inequality. She will discuss how resurrecting the archetypal energies of The Divine Feminine can help us build a regenerative, sustainable and compassionate society on a global scale.

Workman will be discussing the progressive ideas and practical life-tools used to manifest abundance from her book and the return of the Divine Feminine to promote new ways of thinking from the heart for world betterment.

The financial expert and noted economic visionary will provide simple, non-monetary steps that individuals, companies and local governments can take toward building sustainable communities, and peace of mind.

Workman will provide concrete examples of how real-life, self-sustainable, gift-based communities, modeled after natural ecosystems are being created and successfully implemented in cities around the world.

Showing how today’s greed has killed many industries, Workman predicts the death of the debt system and explains how these new, gift-based communities are not only here, they are thriving.

In her book, “Sacred Economics: The Currency of Life”, available from Amazon, Barnes & Noble, iTunes, and Muse Harbor Publishing, Workman offers a logical analysis of the problems that are undermining the global monetary system. She also maps out steps individuals and governments can take to move beyond our present economic gridlock to create a real sustainable and life-affirming economy.

Workman worked most recently as a First Vice President of Investments with a major international Wall Street firm and draws upon her work experience and extensive research, to present a powerful argument that the outmoded and corrupted vehicle of capitalism cannot sustain us for another generation.

Workman does not blame capitalism for the problems we face. Instead, she questions why society continues to worship the aggressive growth engine that drives our global economy.

Why is debt necessary? How can society overcome greed? Why does poverty exist? Is a moneyless society possible? By carefully deconstructing our shared, often unexamined beliefs around “making the grade” in modern society, Sacred Economics points to an evolutionary opportunity.

Sacred Economics’ inspired perspective explains why humans are drawn to the innovation of creative exchange, and how-in the interest of becoming the best we can collectively be-society might direct their attention toward the purposeful design of a more compassionate, cooperative and abundantly flowing economic system.

Workman says, “Better to confront our fear, our unknown self, than to run because we’re too afraid to ask those questions we’ve been taught never to ask. Those questions: Who am I? Why am I here? What is my life purpose? What am I capable of doing? Does God exist, and what is my relationship to this world?”

Ms. Workman, an engaging speaker, financial expert and global economic visionary, can be reached for further Radio, TV, Print and Online interviews or event speaking engagements, by contacting Margaux(at)museharbor(dot)com. Friend Eileen on Facebook to join her blog and conversations on innovative solutions and political/economic philosophies targeting a wide array of current events.

Muse Harbor Publishing was founded in 2011 as an organization of “writers helping writers, in service to our readers.”

 

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At the Scene of The (Left Coast) Crime

lcc_notebookWhile I’ve long been an advocate and frequent attendee of the California Writers Conference scene, the Left Coast Crime Conference (Monterey, Mar.20-23) is my first foray into the fan-of-the-genre conference. And I’ve already penciled in my commitment to next year’s LCC in Portland, Oregon. The truth is, this is much more fun than writing.

Many of the fans are also authors and most of the authors are also fans. There’s a thrilling sort of intensity, a near obsessive adoration at play here. (Some flew in from the Right Coast to hang with their favorite writers. I find that intense.) The fans love new writers who, in turn, love the newly published writers, who in turn love the seasoned writers. And the elite—many of whom were present—clearly love the fans. I watched Sue Grafton get more hugs than a cute baby on Christmas morning. And she didn’t mind in the least.

Unlike the workshop-based writers conferences, where both egos and fears can sometimes run rampant, I’ve discovered the fan-based conference to be far more casual, even playful. Fans meet authors, chat with authors, eat with authors and immerse themselves in a genre they clearly love. I put the mystery fan up there with the romance and sci-fi/fantasy fan—dedicated, loyal and extremely knowledgeable. Many of the fans have tried writing, or else find themselves in the midst of their first effort—and what better way than to “feel the buzz.” And unlike the workshop atmosphere (where hopes are often dashed by a careless critique or two), the more casual ambiance of simply chatting about one’s profession, or obsession, strikes me as a far more pleasant way to soak it all up.

Far better for those just beginning to write, I think, to be mesmerized by the success of others than to to find oneself in the trenches too early. Yes, writing is hard. Yes, success is hard. But not beyond your dreams. If you’ve wandered through the Left Coast Crime Book Room, you see the astounding possibilities.

 

Notes From A Conference Room

So where’s the ice water?

As a first-time attendee, and first time panelist (“Now What? Industry Experts on New Publishing Options”) I devoted much of my attention to new writers, or those dangling from the precipice. The changing industry has orphaned many successful mid-list authors, who now find themselves struggling with the option of self-publishing or a smaller press. (A midlist author isn’t a best seller, but rather a self-sustaining author with a large enough fan-base to remain moderately successful, from book to book.) However, with the midlist author a vanishing species, what’s the alternative?

My co-panelists and I (moderator Stacey Cochran, Christine Munroe of Kobo and Jeffrey Weber of Stark Raving Group) were pretty much in total agreement for the duration. Yes, there’s hope. Options exist for new writers and authors in transition. Traditional publishing is in flux, and some writers will be lost to the Way Things Will Work—but I truly believe good writing will find a home.

Small presses (like Muse Harbor) are beginning to thrive—one author at a time. We’re planning just 12 titles for the 2015 calendar year, and not one David Baldacci or J.D. “Nora” Robb among them. Meaning we intend to prevail on the new and midlist author, and are hoping to boot at least one of them upstairs into that stellar category. We have only two publication slots available for our next year’s roster (and I came home with 30+ new manuscripts and queries from the Left Coast Crime crowd—so you do realize the necessity of very good writing) but if the increasing number new presses can churn out a dozen or two authors a year, gradually both writers and readers will find a new influx of talent worth their time and attention.

What about self-publishing? Sure, that’s a viable option. However, as panelist/author Claire Johnson said, “You don’t self publish because nobody else wants your work. You self publish because you want the control.” Meaning, good writing is still paramount. Self-publishing affords you the ultimate creative control—marketing, social networking, book design, management, accounting and ultimately pay-off as well—but you have to be ready for that challenge. If you’re self-publishing and still not succeeding, perhaps it’s time for a rewrite? A new novel? A fresh start.

The key to success? Many variables—with, for better or worse, a healthy quotient of “luck” among them—factor into a writer’s success. But I believe marketing to be a fundamental key. And few small presses (or large traditional publishers, for that matter) have yet to discover that magical “Can’t Fail” strategy. At Muse Harbor, we’re looking at traditional marketing solutions, but we’re also taking the “small steps” approach, building an author’s audience one loyal reader at a time. No, you won’t be partying with Dennis Lehane or Patricia Cornwell just yet…but with a bit of luck, diligence and perhaps another novel or two under your belt, maybe they’ll be calling you up for an invite of their own.

 

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Muse Harbor Publishing Launches Young Adult Magical Mystery Novel April, Maybe June on March 20

book6Muse Harbor Publishing Launches Young Adult Magical Mystery Novel “April, Maybe June” at Left Coast Crime 2014 – Monterey March 20

Popular Author Shalanna Collins Debuts “April, Maybe June” Novel as First Book in Bliss Sisters Magical Adventures Series.

Santa Barbara, CA (PRWEB) March 18, 2014

On March 20, 2014, Muse Harbor Publishing’s author of six published novels, Shalanna Collins, debuts her new Young Adult mystery with a magical twist, April, Maybe June to crime readers and writers during the sold-out Left Coast Crime Conference in Monterey, CA.

Collins, a seasoned past conference attendee, will be joined by her publisher, Muse Harbor’s Fiction Editor, Dave Workman, to meet new and veteran crime readers and writers, sign books and promote the launch of April, Maybe June.

Pamela Dean, Author of Tam Lin, and The Secret Country, says “April is the book’s delightful narrator, both witty and unintentionally funny, one of those kids people sometimes say were ‘born old,’ but young and earnest and energetic too. She is fiercely loyal to family and takes this to its logical conclusion in a twisty magical plot full of both humor and terror.”

Workman, crime noir author of On The Rocks, was recently coined by award-winning author Matthew J Pallamary as “The New Elmore Leonard.” Workman will be speaking on a Left Coast Crime Conference panel, promoting both his and Collin’s new crime novels, as well as looking for new authors to publish under Muse Harbor’s moniker.

Collin’s clever young adult novel April, Maybe June, finds home-schooled siblings April and June Bliss inadvertently sucked into their older cousin Arlene’s troubled life when the street-savvy 17-year-old disappears, then sends for their help via an inscrutable grimoire and a mesmerizing silver ring. When life turns supernaturally spooky, April and June must pull together to survive.

April, Maybe June is available on Amazon.com and Museharbor.com. For more of Collins’ writing, visit her blogs at shalanna.livejournal.com, shalannacollins.blogspot.com, deniseweeks.blogspot.com and Friend her on facebook.com/ShalannaCollinsBooks.

Collins graduated from Southern Methodist University with a BS in Computer Science and a BA in Mathematics and has published fiction in several genres, including mystery, fantasy, chick lit, and romantic suspense. She has also published books written as Denise Weeks. “April, Maybe June” is the first book in her Bliss Sisters Magical Adventures series. When she isn’t writing fiction, Collins tutors secondary school math, works as a literacy volunteer, does research on the Internet, and noodles on the piano. She and her husband live happily in a northern suburb of Dallas.

Based in Santa Barbara, CA, Muse Harbor Publishing was founded in 2011 as “writers helping writers, in service to our readers.”

 

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Active Language

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Rules-headerA blog for fiction writers and impending writers. An editor’s perspective.

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Active Writing (Part 2): Active Language (Grammar, sentence structure, linguistics)

To recap: I look for active writing—the life of a novel—on three distinct levels: 1. Voice, 2. Language and, 3. Plot.

I’ll keep this simple for both our sakes. If you need a grammar lesson, we’re both in the wrong place.

But, in the English language (as compared to, say, Kayabi, and whatever Yoda spoke), the simplest way to invoke energy and emotion into sentence structure is typically: Subject (S) + Verb (V) + Object (O). Thus: John (S) kissed (V) Mary (O). Or: Laura (S) + killed (V) + the snake (O).

As opposed to Mary was kissed by John. Or; The snake was killed by Laura. Or even more passive: It was the snake that was killed by Laura.

By rearranging the sentence structure to the less energetic Object + Verb + Subject (OVS), the writer’s placing the action’s instigator at the end of the sentence and slightly altering the emphasis. And in longer, more complex sentences, both nuance and structure can become uncomfortably apparent. You’re also clogging your story with extremely passive verbs; “was” and “were;” unnecessary prepositions, pronouns, articles and the so-called “little” phrases (e.g.; it would, that were, of the, by which). Such utterly unexciting placeholders act as a buffer between words and action.

For instance, a subtle but distinct difference exists between: Prince Clarion crushed the giant orc’s head and The head of the giant orc was crushed by Prince Clarion. While both structural formats can and will ultimately co-exist in your novel, play with the most active structure first. This is especially important in scenes of passion, action, high tension or terror.

Rule #6: The Jumping Cow Rule (Active vs. Passive Voice). I learned this tenet once upon a time in Eng. Lit. 101. These words have kept Prince Clarion blissfully crushing orcs’ heads ever since:

ActiveThe cow jumped over the moon.
PassiveThe moon was jumped over by the cow.
Bad passiveIt was the moon that was jumped over by the cow.*

* Exceptions always exist. You’ll eventually find this particular phraseology a perfect fit for your needs and, by all means, use it. However, if you find yourself using this grammatical gremlin as a basic structural pattern—then no, you’re not infusing sufficient excitement into your writing. You’re using passive language way too often. And no, Muse Harbor will probably not publish you.

And, no, simply because Hemingway frequently used passive voice, you may not. And, no, because David Foster Wallace did so in present tense—”I am this” and “I am that”—you may not. “It was…” is glaringly overused in modern fictive writing. More often than not, excessive passive voice is a sign of tired writing. Meaning your brain’s full. Put down your pencil. Take a walk. Take a nap. Clean the house. Because most “it” usage can transmogrify into far more descriptive prose. Occasionally, it fits such sentence structure may suffice your needs, but most often, it does not your words can be easily rearranged with far more passion and creativity.

While I doubt any author can (or should) write an entire novel strictly using SVO sentence structure, I suggest keeping this grammatical sequence as a staple tool for active writing. The volcano belched a cascade of hot lava. Rather than: Hot lava was belching from the volcano. Realize that by simply altering your subject (from OVS), you can maintain the SVO principle but also shift your reader’s attention, such as: Hot lava poured from the mountain’s ruptured peak. With nary a “was” or “were” in sight.

A good many novice writers (and even published pro’s) can occasionally slip into a steady flow of passivity. Be on the constant lookout for:

It was a dark and stormy night. Linda was sleeping. There was a noise that awakened her with a start. What was that? she wondered. Was somebody standing outside her door. Was it her husband, Teddy? It was because she didn’t know that she tiptoed to the door. There was only silence beyond the door. Linda was scared and we, dear reader, are ready to close this book forever.

So look closely for any steady stream of passive sentence structure beginning with tired phraseology: It was, They were, There was—and the dreaded It was because…. Each of these sentences can be actively rearranged (and the more you begin to do so, the easier such restructuring becomes).

I’ve occasionally come upon an interesting side-effect of passive language. If a writer twists and contorts various, meaningless phrases long and hard enough, the words sometimes almost sound correct. In fact, a writer may even convince himself that such lavish flow of language sounds positively Shakespearean. But this style of writing is roughly akin to spritzing a pig in expensive French perfume. He may smell nice for awhile, but you still won’t want to kiss him.

For example, this sentence still smells like a pig: “Of that substance to which Richard was most disinclined ever to confront, he promised himself never again to touch it to his lips.”

Keep your message simple. What’s the idea you’re trying to impart here? It’s: Richard hated chocolate, right?

So how might one say that creatively? How about: Richard couldn’t understand the world’s love affair with chocolate. On his tongue, the candy oozed like motor oil, and tasted, to his best perception, like dirty butter.

A simple thought, distinctly perceived, clearly transmitted. Active, not passive.
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